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Building Material Costs – HOA Decisions and Roofing Construction Questions for 2011

Not long ago, I was discussing with an acquaintance the issues with increasing building material costs as we head into 2011. Everything points to rapid cost increases, and wholesale inflation in the construction sector. Labor, fuel for delivery, commodities, environmental regulation, and all the supply and demand economic issues which go with economic expansion, which is where we are headed in 2011.
Now then, should an HOA consider the timing if they are going to for example make a decision whether or not to spend on refurbishing such a painting, or roofing? Okay so let’s talk about this shall we, let’s talk about costs and future increases.
For instance, we know that transportation Costs to deliver building (roofing) materials – as oil is going to $100/ barrel mid-year 2011, I’d say a trading range of $95-$109 in 2011- which equates to higher pump prices, and building materials are heavy, and must be transported. This could add an additional 10% and another ten percent in production of that material. Not even touching on the raw materials and commodity markets of so much of the building material supplies. I also recently talked to a semi-retired floor tile wholesaler, he said prices were already rising and expected them to continue to rise, even their Chinese building products.
In essence what I am saying is that ALL indicators that I can see point to higher building material and Electrician Job Description Pdf related costs, and those price increases will far outpace sticking the HOA’s money in a money-market or interest bearing account. I just do not see any rational argument against you ascertain that now is the time to invest.
Also consider the 2010-2011 roofing tax credits, which will be expiring, that ought to pique the interest of a Home Owners Association right about now? Why not take advantage of those savings too? And Reed Construction Data forecasts show semi-favorable supply issues, but increasing wholesale costs for materials throughout 2011. Allied Building Materials has put out a letter to all their customers of interior construction materials price increase effective January 1, yes, that’s interior not exterior, but it tells the same story. RPM announced its second quarter results, with this little tid-bit from a shareholder’s report from:
“Our industrial segment should continue its strong performance in the back half of this fiscal year, with signs of improvement in the depressed commercial construction market this spring, while consumer sales are expected to be relatively flat as they face very strong prior-year comparisons, combined with consumer uncertainty. We anticipate that raw material challenges will persist through the remainder of this fiscal year,” Sullivan stated.”
Which suggests that they may not be able to pass on those increased raw material costs, and this company does make: “RPM’s industrial products include roofing systems, sealants, corrosion control coatings, flooring coatings and specialty chemicals.” Now then, regarding my comments in a previous article about How To Hire A Contractor For My Business Labor Costs in 2011, and the construction environmental …

6 Questions Construction Contractors Must Answer to Manage Delay and Disruption Claims

In a construction delay and disruption dispute, the judge or adjudicator will usually base judgement on a key overriding factor: how the decisions that the project administrator or project manager should have taken at the time the delay happened compared with the actions that were actually taken.
The examination of a delay and disruption claim will often call into question the promises that were made at the outset of the programme, the quality of the project planning, the methods and validity of communication between contractor and employer, the competencies of individuals involved in project planning and the contrator’s administrative procedures.
The granularity of the information required to fulfill these information needs and the scrutiny under which information is placed can come as a shock to many facing a delay and disruption proceeding for the first time.
There are many aspects of a programme that will be analysed during a delay claim and the contractor must be in a position to have answers to those questions that will fall under the scrutiny of a delay and disruption adjudicator or judge. Following are six of the most poignant questions that will require explanation:
1. Is the contract programme which has been signed off by the client the same programme that the contractor has been following?
2. Has the contractor been officially recording all strategic assumptions associated with the programme, Adair Homes Floor Plans like the duration of key activities, the requirements of third-party involvement, and so on?
3. Has all project progress been entered and updated accurately and in a timely fashion into an accessible repository, and are any remaining durations accurate?
4. Do the records show clearly the resources that were planned against those that were deployed? List Of Building Materials For A House Is there clear evidence of the activities that each of the resources was engaged upon?
5. Can the contractor produce sufficient and specific evidence to support each change event?
These are not the only questions and there is perhaps one further, crucial, question:
6. Do the available records match those of the other parties?
They are ‘scary’ questions and it’s tough to provide concrete evidence on all of the above unless you have ensured from day one that you have the capability to capture that information. Reputations are at stake during delay and disruption disputes. Spreadsheet project management templates are simply not enough. Having professional construction project management tools in place to manage every programme, and learning how to use them to support project time management, project communications with the customer and good collaboration is one of the only ways to mitigate the risk.…

Frequently Asked Questions About Remodeling Your Home

Sometimes it happens in a store, sometimes at the gas station. It happens once in a while when I’m picking my daughter up at school. It always happens at parties. As soon as someone finds out that I am a contractor I get asked. It usually goes like this: “So you do home remodeling, what would it cost to remodel my home?”
My favorite answer is actually a question of my own: “What does it cost to eat dinner in a restaurant?”
The answer, to both questions, is “It depends.” If we are talking about dinner, it could be $3.99 at Roberto’s or $399.00 at the Hotel Del. It depends on the food, the environment, and a million other details. If we are talking about remodeling, it depends on whether you want a simple extension of your family room, or an entire second story master suite complete with fireplace and luxurious bathroom. The bottom line is that what it costs depends on what you want.
The next question is usually some variation on “How long would it take to remodel my home?” Again, Home Construction Materials this is like asking how long it takes to cook dinner-and the answer is the same: “It depends.”
The actual Home Builders Ranch time varies according to the size of the project-of course remodeling a bathroom is going to take less time than building a whole new second story. Sometimes simply getting to the start point seems to take forever.
 Most remodeling projects require City approval in the form of a permit, and this process can be very lengthy. In the beach areas, you may also have to get approval from the Coastal Commission, or if your home is on a canyon, you may have restrictions because of endangered species living there. Researching and resolving these issues must be done before anything is built. This adds time to the job, and we have little control over how much.
Usually when I start explaining the permit process and zoning regulations the question becomes “Why can’t I do what I want with my own home?”. In terms of permits, I use the restaurant analogy: the Building Department issues permits for building like the Health Department issues permits for food service. The City wants to insure that structures are safe to occupy and resistant to hazards common in the area (e.g., earthquakes, floods, etc.). I’m sure you want that too- after all you wouldn’t want your neighbor’s house to burn up (and possibly cause yours to burn too) because the electrical system was installed improperly.
In regard to zoning, I can only say that the planning groups that determine zoning regulations and review any exemption requests are made up of civic-minded folks that want the best for our City. You may not agree with all their decisions-I don’t always agree with them either-but you must agree that it’s a difficult job to accommodate everyone’s needs and desires for their community.
When I meet someone who has already …

Construction Interview – What Questions Will I Typically Be Asked on a Job Interview?

Bali Landscape Photography interview: There are many good, construction interviewing Q&A books available so an construction executive should never be unprepared on an construction interview. Typical questions include:
“What can you tell me about yourself?”
“What do you know about our construction employer?”
“Why would our job and construction employer be of interest to you?”
“Describe your Subcontractor Taxes Calculator leadership and management skills, and provide examples of situations that reflect those skills?”
“How do you perform under pressure and provide an example of a recent, high-pressure, work situation?”
“What are your greatest strengths and weaknesses?”
“What motivates you?”
“Why did you leave your last job or why would you leave your current job?”
“What kind of compensation are you looking for?”
“Why should I hire you over the other construction executives?”
“What is your greatest, work accomplishment and civic accomplishment?”
Before posting to any Web forum, check if it has a Search feature. If it does, try a couple of keyword searches for something like your problem; it just might help. If you did a general Web search before (as you should have), search the forum anyway; your Web-wide search engine might not have all of this forum indexed recently. When a project has a development mailing list, write to the mailing list, not to individual developers, even if you believe you know who can best answer your question.
Check the documentation of the project and its homepage for the address of a project mailing list, and use it. There is an increasing tendency for projects to do user support over a Web forum or IRC channel, with e-mail reserved more for development traffic. So look for those channels first when seeking project-specific help.…